Home > Crossway Blog > Translating vs. Transliterating “Beulah”

Translating vs. Transliterating “Beulah”

Mark at Every Thought, Every Word talks about the Hebrew word beulah in Isaiah 62:4.

The KJV transliterates the first instance of the word and translates the second:

Thou shalt no more be termed Forsaken; neither shall thy land any more be termed Desolate: but thou shalt be called Hephzibah, and thy land Beulah: for the LORD delighteth in thee, and thy land shall be married.

The ESV and other translations translate both instances (the ESV adds several footnotes to this verse):

You shall no more be termed Forsaken,
and your land shall no more be termed Desolate,
but you shall be called My Delight Is in Her,
and your land Married;
for the Lord delights in you,
and your land shall be married.

Mark goes on to explain some of this passage’s implications. We simply wanted to point out the strategies different translation teams can take when faced with a choice between transliterating a word and translating it into English.

He also has a nifty ESV banner on his blog that we haven’t seen before:

ESV Bible

July 12, 2006 | Posted in: ESV,Translation | Author: Crossway Staff @ 9:07 am | (2) Comments »

2 Comments

  1. Translating vs. Transliterating “Beulah”

    Stephen of the ESV Bible Blog has blogged today on two approaches to translation of the Hebrew word “Beulah.” I prefer the ESV approach which is to translate the meaning of the Hebrew word, rather than transliterate it.

    Translation is more meaning…

    Trackback by Better Bibles Blog — July 12, 2006 @ 1:51 pm

  2. Stephen of the ESV Bible Blog has blogged today on two approaches to translation of the Hebrew word “Beulah” in Isaiah 62:4. I prefer the ESV approach which is to translate the meaning of the Hebrew word, rather than transliterate it.

    Trackback by Translating vs. Transliterating “Beulah” — January 18, 2007 @ 4:23 pm

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.