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New Video Teaching DVD for “A Woman’s Wisdom”

Advice books continue to top bestseller lists even though much of the “wisdom” being offered proves shallow in the long run. Many women are looking for practical, proven advice for life, and the book of Proverbs is one of the wisest places to start.

This one-disc DVD features popular Bible teacher Lydia Brownback unpacking the wisdom found in the book of Proverbs and serves as a companion to her book, A Woman’s Wisdom. Brownback shows how the Bible speaks to real life issues such as money, purity, marriage, and the day-to-day grind in a conversational, engaging manner in each of the 10 sessions (sessions are each approx. 20 minutes in length).

See the trailer below, and learn more here.

 

Endorsements for A Woman’s Wisdom:

“This is one of those books that should be studied more than simply read, and I can see it as a valuable resource for women’s Bible studies.”
Jerry Bridges, author, The Pursuit of Holiness

“From the wisdom of Proverbs, Lydia Brownback draws wise and ever so practical applications for women. Her clear and consistent call is to embrace the full wisdom of God given to us in Christ.”
Kathleen Nielson, Director of Women’s Initiatives, The Gospel Coalition

 

December 20, 2012 | Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Book News,News & Announcements,Video,Video,Wisdom,Women, Wives, Mothers | Author: Lindsay Tully @ 8:00 am | 0 Comments »

Conflict: When Desires Become Demands

Conflict in this world is inevitable. The question is, how will we handle it?

We’re glad you’ve joined us for Part 2 in a series on conflict with Robert Jones, author of Pursuing Peace: A Christian Guide to Handling Our Conflicts. Yesterday we started with Part 1, 3 Ways We Must Handle Conflict.

One major cause for conflict is when a desire for a good thing becomes a James 4:1-3 type of demand.

3 tests to help you detect conflict-causing demands:

  1. Does it consume my thoughts? Do I obsess about it? Does my mind drift to it when I don’t have to think about other things (like when I am showering)?
  2. Do I sin to get it? Do I manipulate people or situations to get what I want? Do I bargain or nag or guilt trip?
  3. Do I sin when I don’t get it? Do I pout or explode or pull away or gossip about someone when he or she doesn’t give me my desired thing?

While my initial desire might be legitimate, it becomes sinful when it grows into a demand. And when it becomes a demand and you don’t meet it—and of course you can never meet every demand of my selfish heart—I then judge you in my heart and condemn you. In the final step, my internal judgment produces some outward expression of punishment toward you. I might yell at you, speak sarcastically about you, gossip about you, or avoid you.

4 Statements to help you unearth conflict-causing demands:

  • “You must give me ____  or I’ll be angry at you or cold toward you or . . .”
  • “If only ____ would change, I would be satisfied or content.”
  • “If I don’t get ____, then I become depressed, angry, or anxious.”
  • “What I think I need or I desperately want is ____.”

Left unchecked, any desire has the potential to overthrow and remove Jesus. The desires of my flesh versus Spirit civil war (Gal. 5:16–26; 1 Pet. 2:11–12) continually plots a coup d’état against King Jesus as my rightful Lord. Apart from grace the remnant sin in my heart would overthrow my enthroned King.

How does God want us to handle our desires that grow into demands? A simple alliterated outline provides a plan: Recognize, Repent, Refocus, and Replace.

Join us tomorrow to see what Dr. Jones has to say about this plan.

Robert Jones serves as a biblical counseling professor at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is a certified biblical counselor, a Christian conciliator, an adjunct instructor, and a church reconciliation trainer with Peacemaker Ministries. Jones is the author of Pursuing Peace: A Christian Guide to Handling Our Conflicts and has written numerous ministry booklets and articles.

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Video: Justin Taylor interviews Lydia Brownback on “A Woman’s Wisdom”

Advice books are no short-lived trend, even though much of the advice parading as “wisdom” proves shallow in the long run. What we need is biblical wisdom, and even more than that we need hearts set on the One who governs all our practicalities.

Join Justin Taylor and Lydia Brownback as they discuss her new book A Woman’s Wisdom: How the Book of Proverbs Speaks to Everything.

  • 0:01 – You’ve written books for women on being single, on devotions—why did you want to dedicate an entire book to exploring the book of Proverbs?
  • 1:17 – Is this book for all kinds of women?
  • 1:29 – So much of the book of Proverbs is directed from a king figure to a son, and much of it is oriented towards men. What does the book of proverbs have to say to women in particular?
  • 2:51 – Is Proverbs more than just a moral, “how-to” manual?
  • 4:54 – The heart of the book is 6 things every wise woman needs to know. What are those things and how did you structure that section?
  • 7:39 – The study guide is great for women’s groups, mothers and daughters,  and friends. How can your expertise not only teach them but help them talk about these issues.
  • 8:18 – Justin Taylor: “Thank you for writing this book. I’m eager to share it with women I know.”

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May 14, 2012 | Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Book News,News & Announcements,Video,Video,Wisdom,Women, Wives, Mothers | Author: Lindsay Tully @ 4:06 pm | 0 Comments »

Wise Women Know How to Think, Feel, and Want (Part 3)

The last two days, we’ve looked at what Proverbs has to say about thinking and feeling. Today, Lydia walks us through what Proverbs has to say about what we want. (Read part one and part two).

Adapted from A Woman’s Wisdom: How the Book of Proverbs Speaks to Everything by Lydia Brownback

Desires

Our desires—the things we want—tend to govern our lives and our choices. For that reason, it is important that our desires get formed in a biblical mold. Right now, today, we all desire something. It might be a desire we’ve carried in our heart for years, or perhaps it’s more recent. It might be something that springs from our feminine nature—a husband, a child, a home of our own. Some of us desire healing, either for an illness or for a relationship. It might be a desire for a major change, such as a different job or a relocation. It could be something simpler such as a break in the routine by means of two weeks at the beach or just by getting out of the kitchen for a night or two. It is to be hoped that above all our desires, we desire God himself.

Sometimes the way in which we describe a particular desire is merely our attempt to give shape to some deeper yearning in our hearts that we cannot name. Our desire for marriage, home, and family, for example, may be how we give expression to our longing for love, belonging, and the banishment of loneliness. No matter the specifics of our desires or how we express them, all our longings are indicative of the fact that we aren’t home yet. We are unfinished women living in an unfinished world, and because of that, we aren’t going to find full satisfaction until we get home, until we are perfected in Christ and living with him in heaven. Until then, we are going to remain women who want.

Many of the things we desire are hardwired into us. God designed us to want home and family and to be fed and clothed and sheltered; and there is nothing wrong with these desires. The problem is that we tend to want them too much. When that happens, good desires get warped into slave masters. We are enslaved to any desire that we believe we must have in order to be content. For that reason, we do well to consider what Proverbs says about our desires.

Proverbs distinguishes between good desire and bad, and between good, better, and best, and it puts wisdom at the forefront of desirable acquisitions.

Wisdom is better than jewels, and all that you may desire cannot compare with her. (Prov. 8:11)

What the Word of God is telling us here is that no matter how worthwhile our desires, nothing will prove as rewarding and satisfying as the obtainment of wisdom. Since this is true, you’d think we would set our passions to work on laying hold of it much more than we do. If we craved wisdom as much as we do things and relationships and success, we’d be much more contented than we often are. It is God’s will to provide us with wisdom, whereas it may not be in his plan to give us any number of the other things on which we set our hearts, which is what accounts for most discontentment.

In fact, it might actually be that God withholds something we want because our desire for it is so intense that having it would prove harmful to us. David Powlison says,

Our desires for good things seize the throne, becoming idols that replace the King. God refuses to serve our instinctive longings, but commands us to be ruled by other longings. What God commands, He provides the power to accomplish.

So the first thing we learn about desires from Proverbs is that the best desire—and the one we are guaranteed to get—is wisdom.

Lydia Brownback is the author of several books. She served as writer-in-residence for Rev. Alistair Begg and as the broadcast media manager for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. A regular speaker at women’s conferences, Brownback also blogs at The Purple Cellar. She holds degrees from Syracuse University and Westminster Theological Seminary.

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Wise Women Know How to Think, Feel, and Want (Part 2)

Yesterday, we looked at what Proverbs has to say about how we should think. Today, Lydia walks us through what Proverbs has to say about our emotions. If you missed Part 1, you can read it here.

Adapted from A Woman’s Wisdom: How the Book of Proverbs Speaks to Everything by Lydia Brownback

Feelings

Just consider the roller-coaster ride of emotions we can experience in the course of a single week (or, for some of us, a single day): anger, love, frustration, joy, sorrow, annoyance, irritation, fear, anxiety, peace, satisfaction, exultation, discouragement, happiness, fulfillment, dissatisfaction, anticipation. The list could go on. I’ve met some even-keeled women over the years, and I used to chalk it up to natural-born temperament. Over time, however, I’ve come to see that such equilibrium has as much to do with maturity as it does with birth.

We are quick to blame our circumstances or our hormones for our mood swings, and there is no doubt that the stresses of life and body do have a significant impact on how we feel. Nevertheless, we don’t have to be—nor should we allow ourselves to be—victimized by our feelings. The wild fluctuation of our hormones at certain times may challenge our tolerance of others or depress our outlook, but nowhere does the Bible give us a hormonal pass on the call to kindness, patience, contentment, joy, and love. Instead of being victimized by what provokes negative emotions, we can view the provocations the way Paul viewed his thorn in the flesh. If God doesn’t remove the thorn as a result of our pleading, we have an opportunity to experience Christ’s sufficiency in the midst of it.

Of course, none of us is ever going to master our emotions completely. For one thing, God didn’t create us to be robots. He designed us to feel the ups and the downs. Additionally, it is often the down times and our wrestlings in them that produce the most spiritual fruit. Therefore, wise women don’t debunk their feelings; rather, they take charge of them. Elisabeth Elliot advises:

Do not try to fortify yourself against emotions. Recognize them; name them, if that helps; and then lay them open before the Lord for His training of your responses. The discipline of emotions is the training of responses.

This “training of responses” is how wisdom is lived out and how we become characterized as women of wisdom. We can summarize the wisdom of emotional restraint as “giving free reign to emotions only to the extent that doing so brings no harm to people or dishonor to God’s name.”

Lydia Brownback is the author of several books. She served as writer-in-residence for Rev. Alistair Begg and as the broadcast media manager for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. A regular speaker at women’s conferences, Brownback also blogs at The Purple Cellar. She holds degrees from Syracuse University and Westminster Theological Seminary.

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