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Weekly Ebook Deals: Featuring Titles from The Gospel Coalition

The Gospel Coalition National Conference is underway this week in Orlando. We’ve already heard some excellent messages from the Gospel of Luke through the free live feed hosted by our friends at the Gospel Coalition.

In parallel with the conference, we’ve put together an ebook sale featuring several recent Gospel Coalition titles, books on the conference theme, and books by conference speakers.

To learn more about each title, click on the covers to find them at Crossway.org or search at any of these online stores: Amazon, Christianbook.com, Vyrso, eChristian, Bookshout!, Barnes & Noble, or a participating online bookstore.

Discounted prices available through 4/15/2013.

Featured Gospel Coalition Titles:

The Gospel As Center

The Gospel As Center

Edited by D. A. Carson, Timothy Keller

$14.99 $5.99

This collection of essays offers timely and valuable core teachings of an evangelical movement dedicated to the gospel of Christ and a Scripture-based reformation of ministry practices.

Entrusted with the Gospel

Entrusted with the Gospel: Pastoral Expositions of 2 Timothy

Edited by D. A. Carson

$12.99 $4.99

Stemming from the Gospel Coalition’s 2009 National Conference, this book features Piper, Ryken, Driscoll, Copeland, Duncan, and Chapell expositing 2 Timothy, encouraging the faithful proclamation of the gospel in all areas of ministry.

Don't Call it a Comeback

Don’t Call It a Comeback: The Old Faith for a New Day

Edited by Kevin DeYoung

$13.99 $4.99

Don’t Call It a Comeback unites some of today’s most promising young evangelicals in a bold assertion of the stability, relevance, and necessity of Christian orthodoxy, and reasserts the theological nature of evangelicalism.

Featured Titles on the Conference Theme and by Conference Speakers:

Jesus the Son of God

Jesus the Son of God: A Christological Title Often Overlooked, Sometimes Misunderstood, and Currently Disputed

By D. A. Carson

$12.99 $3.99

Surveys the meaning and implications of Jesus’s divine sonship for how modern Christians think and speak about Christ, especially in relation to Bible translation and missionary engagement with Muslims across the globe.

A Meal with Jesus

A Meal with Jesus: Discovering Grace, Community, and Mission around the Table

By Tim Chester

$11.99 $3.99

Meals are an important part of hospitality, and Chester demonstrates how they can be used to foster grace in our communities. He draws from six narratives in the Gospel of Luke to urge sacrificial giving and loving around the table.

Loving the Way Jesus Loves

Loving the Way Jesus Loves

By Philip Graham Ryken

$11.99 $4.99

Seasoned pastor and college president Phil Ryken offers a unique exploration of 1 Corinthians 13, showing how every aspect of this famous chapter is perfectly illustrated in the life of Jesus Christ.

Scandalous

Scandalous: The Cross and Resurrection of Jesus

By D. A. Carson

$12.99 $4.99

Exposition of five passages of Scripture examines the historicity and theological significance of the cross. Carson’s addition to the Re:Lit series preserves weighty theology while also exploring the irony and strangeness of the cross.

The Lamb of God

The Lamb of God: Seeing Jesus in Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy

By Nancy Guthrie

$13.99 $5.99

This ten-week Bible study in the popular Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament series completes Guthrie’s coverage of the Pentateuch, showing how to see the person and work of Jesus in Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

Dangerous Calling

Dangerous Calling: Confronting the Unique Challenges of Pastoral Ministry

By Paul David Tripp

$13.99 $4.99

Recognizing the widespread struggles facing pastors today, Tripp exposes and exhorts the cultures that train and support our church leaders so that they can lead well and our churches can be healthy.

Happy reading!

April 9, 2013 | Posted in: Books,Digital,Life of Christ,Ministries,New Testament,Person of Christ,Publishing,The Bible | Author: Ted Cockle @ 12:31 pm | (2) Comments »

Free Download: A Sample from “Salvation Accomplished by the Son”

The very heart of Christ’s saving accomplishment is his death and resurrection.

—Robert A. Peterson

As you prepare for Easter, we’d like to help you reflect on Christ’s death and resurrection. Through the first week of April, we’re offering a free download of a significant portion of Robert Peterson’s Salvation Accomplished by the Son: the Work of Christ. In these chapters, Peterson explores Christ’s saving work and offers an in-depth look into Christ’s death and resurrection.

Dr. Chris Morgan, professor of theology and dean of the School of Christian Ministries at California Baptist University, shares his experience reading Peterson’s work during the Easter season:

Salvation Accomplished by the Son

Not long ago I served as the theological reader for Robert’s Peterson’s Salvation Accomplished by the Son. It appeared to be another good book on an important topic, and it was. But it was much more.

Through Robert’s careful framing, unpacking, expounding, and applying of Christ’s saving work, Christ’s death and resurrection gripped me. Passages like Romans 4:25 and Revelation 3:14 came alive. And the significance of our Lord’s resurrection sunk in more deeply. Jesus’ resurrection brings justification, establishes peace with God, and inaugurates the new creation. I already knew and had been teaching and preaching these truths—but not enough and not with such precision.

Thankfully, I was reading the manuscript just weeks before Easter. Many insights into Christ’s death and resurrection not only found their way into me, but also in several sermons that month. Indeed, I specifically contacted Robert a few times that month to thank him for writing it and to let him know how helpful the book was in my preaching.

Download the sample chapters or learn more about the book.

 

 

Video: Dr. Bruce Ware Answers Questions About “The Man Christ Jesus”

Have you ever struggled to understand and explain the biblical truth that Jesus is both fully man and fully God?

If so, you’re not alone—this is a question that Christians have wrestled with for thousands of years. Whether you’re trying to grasp this doctrine or just need to take a few minutes to rejoice in the wonder of the Incarnation, tune in to this discussion between Bruce Ware, author of The Man Christ Jesus, and Dane Ortlund, Bible Publishing Director at Crossway, as they discuss Jesus Christ, God made flesh.

Timestamps:

00:30: What drove you (Bruce Ware) to write this book?

01:50: You start the book with a discussion of Philippians 2. Why did you choose to reference Philippians?  Help us especially understand what it means when Paul says that Jesus “emptied himself” and became a servant.

03:57: When I (Dane Ortlund) think about the supernatural things Jesus did, my default mode is to think that Jesus is “falling back on his deity.” Help us understand the way you deconstruct and provide a corrective to that logic.

06:23: You have a chapter in the book that discusses Christ’s impeccability. What does it mean that Jesus was impeccable and how does that connect to his humanity? What does that mean for believers today?

09:25: Why did Jesus have to come as a man and not a woman?

11:43: What would you say to a woman who says to you, “Ok Dr. Ware, Jesus came as a male. Is it not true then that Jesus doesn’t really understand me as a woman?”

14:00: Why did Jesus have to come and be a man to save us? I can understand why only God could save me, but why did the second person of the trinity also need to become fully human and, it seems, do what Psalm 49 says can’t be done?

18:13: Is Jesus still a man today?

20:08: Why is knowing that Jesus’s incarnation is not a “parenthesis” cause for worship?

Interested in learning more about The Man Christ Jesus? Click here for more information

 

An Indirect Approach to Evangelism

Last week we posted on the challenge of sharing the gospel during the holiday season. (Don’t forget to download your free copy of Bringing the Gospel Home by Randy Newman)!

Jerram Barrs offers additional insight that may be helpful as you interact with close friends and family:

Confronting people head-on with the gospel can raise hackles. Depending on the person and their situation, theological matters have the potential to create antagonism in someone’s heart and build barriers. This is not the response we hope to generate with our evangelistic efforts.

Jesus was aware of this possibility and did not always confront people head-on. When confronted with a question from a teacher of the law, Jesus knew that the man’s heart was not ready to hear the truth. Instead, he responded to him by asking questions and telling him the story of the Good Samaritan. The story was intended to to exercise the scholar’s imagination, will, emotions, and mind:

  • “Why did he use a Samaritan as his example?
  • Am I like the priest and Levite in that story?
  • Have I ever helped a stranger in need?
  • Have I ever loved anyone to the same degree that I love myself?
  • Will my knowledge of the law be sufficient for me to inherit eternal life?
  • Can I bring myself to go back to Jesus, humble myself before him, and ask him different questions?

Questions and stories work together like this, long after they are heard, because they engage a person so fully. Most people that we encounter have mechanisms in place to conceal from themselves the truth about what is really going on in the deep recesses of their being. The right questions or the right story can get a person thinking about their motives and the state of their heart in a way that direct facts may not.

Adapted from Learning Evangelism from Jesus by Jerram Barrs

Related Posts:

December 16, 2011 | Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Evangelism,Evangelism & Missions,Holidays,Life & Doctrine,Life of Christ,Ministry,The Christian Life | Author: Crossway Staff @ 8:00 am | 0 Comments »

Work Matters: More But Not Less Than a Carpenter

Reading Mark 6:3, I began to reflect on the significance of Jesus spending so much of his time on earth working with his hands in a carpentry shop. Here was the Son of God sent to earth on a redemptive mission of seeking and saving the lost, of proclaiming the gospel, yet he spent the vast majority of his years on earth making things in an obscure carpentry shop. We know from Luke’s Gospel that even at the age of twelve, Jesus was demonstrating his amazing rabbinical brilliance to the brightest and best in Jerusalem (Luke 2:47). How did Jesus’s brilliance fit in with a carpentry career? At first glance this doesn’t seem to be a very strategic use of the Son of God’s extraordinary gifts or his important messianic mission. Why was it the Father’s will for Jesus to spend so much time in the carpentry shop instead of gracing the Palestinian countryside, proclaiming the gospel and healing the multitudes?

The New Testament records Jesus spending only about three years in itinerant ministry, what we might refer to as full-time vocational ministry. But for the many years before that, Jesus worked as a carpenter.

When we contemplate who Jesus really is, his joyful contentment to work with his hands day after day constructing things, making useful farm implements and household furniture in an obscure Nazareth carpentry shop, we find him truly stunning. Jesus’s work life tells us that he did not think being a carpenter was somehow below him or a poor use of his many gifts.

It is all too easy for us to overlook the fact that Jesus knew what it meant to get up and go to work every day.

Modified from Work Matters by Tom Nelson

October 24, 2011 | Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Life & Doctrine,Life of Christ,Person of Christ,The Christian Life,Vocation,Work & Vocation | Author: Lindsay Tully @ 2:30 pm | 1 Comment »