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Let’s Make Every Sunday Resurrection Sunday

Blog Header - Guest PostThis is a guest post by Adrian Warnock. He is the author of Raised with Christ: How the Resurrection Changes Everything.


Sunday’s Coming!

This week, the attention of every Christian begins to turn towards the vibrant celebration that Easter Sunday will be. Even as we approach Good Friday, we do so with the sure and certain knowledge that, to quote the old preacher, “Sunday’s coming!”

Echoing 1 Corinthians 15, John Stott writes,

“Christianity is in its very essence a resurrection religion. The concept of resurrection lies at its heart. If you remove it, Christianity is destroyed.”

When you think about it, belief in the resurrection of Jesus is what defines Christianity. Paul says,

“If you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.” (Romans 10:9)

This is why I offer the following definition of a Christian in Raised with Christ: someone who believes in the physical resurrection of Jesus Christ and lives in light of the implications of that event.

A Neglected Foundation

However, we often neglect the resurrection in our preaching, reading, conversations, and even our evangelism throughout the rest of the year. If we mention the resurrection at all, it is in the context of arguing for its historicity.

It’s good to be able to explain why we believe Jesus is alive, and I’d encourage you to download a free chapter from Raised With Christ available entitled, “Did Jesus really rise from the dead?

But it’s also important for us to remind ourselves of the many implications of the resurrection. We see, for example, that the preaching of Acts is remarkably centered on the resurrection, which is credited with accomplishing the following:

  • The sending of the Spirit (Acts 2:33)
  • Physical healings (Acts 3:15–16)
  • The conversion of sinners (Acts 3:26)
  • Salvation by union with Jesus (Acts 4:11–12)
  • Jesus’s role as the leader of his church (Acts 5:30–31; 9)
  • Forgiveness of sins (Acts 5:30–31)
  • Comfort for the dying (Acts 7)
  • The commissioning of gospel messengers (Acts 9; 10:42)
  • Freedom from the penalty and power of sin (Acts 13:37–39)
  • Assurance that the gospel is true (Acts 17:31)
  • Our own resurrection (Acts 17:31)
  • Jesus’s future judgment of this world (Acts 17:31)

No wonder Paul said, “It is with respect to the hope and the resurrection of the dead that I am on trial” (Acts 23:6), and his judge summarized: “They had certain points of dispute with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus, who was dead, but whom Paul asserted to be alive” (Acts 25:19).

Not Just the Cross

The resurrection plays a crucial role in our salvation, which we often forget. Romans 4:25 tells us that Jesus was “raised for our justification.” Often times, commentaries simply skip over that phrase—a phrase which is worthy of much contemplation—and we erroneously assume that it was the Cross alone that accomplished the forgiveness of sins.

The resurrection of Jesus also leads directly to a resurrection inside each of us (Ephesians 2:4-6, 2 Timothy 2:11, 1 Peter 1:3, 2 Corinthians 5:17). This means that the very same power that raised Jesus from the dead is pulsating inside the arteries and veins of every true Christian.

God puts the risen life of Jesus in us so that we have a new desire to kill sin (1 John 3:9, Romans 6, Colossians 3:1-11) and begin to truly change (2 Corinthians 3:18, Revelation 1).

As we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus this Easter, let’s resolve to make every Sunday a resurrection Sunday, living in all the good that the resurrection accomplishes for us each day.


Adrian Warnock is a psychiatrist, blogger, church leader, and the author of Raised with Christ: How the Resurrection Changes Everything (excerpt). You can connect with Adrian on Twitter (@adrianwarnock) or read his blog at adrianwarnock.com.

6,000 Bibles Donated to Liberian Pastors at T4G

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Pack the Pallet

At this year’s Together for the Gospel (T4G) conference, Crossway was honored to partner with LifeWay and T4G to collect ESV Global Study Bibles for pastors and church leaders in Liberia, West Africa. Over 7,500 conference attendees were invited to purchase subsidized copies of the Global Study Bible from the conference store and pack them into boxes at Crossway’s booth.

By the end of the conference, nearly 6,000 Global Study Bibles were donated, amounting to seven full pallets of Bibles that will be shipped to Liberia in the coming months.

Thank You!

In the video below, pastor Joseph Johnson of Monrovia shares about the need for God’s Word in places like Liberia and how the donated Bibles will be used to equip local pastors and church leaders.


Pack the Pallet Thank You
from Crossway on Vimeo.

The Final Days of Jesus: Thursday, April 2, AD 33

Final_Days_header05In this week’s video series, well-known New Testament scholars explore the background and significance of the history-shaping events that occurred during Jesus’s last week on earth. Designed as a supplement to The Final Days of Jesus, our prayer is that these videos will help deepen your understanding and experience of Holy Week.



The Final Days of Jesus: Thursday
from Crossway on Vimeo.

 

6-Final-Days-of-Jesus_Holy-Week-Thursday

 

Previous Videos:


The Final Days of Jesus: The Most Important Week of the Most Important Person Who Ever Lived
Andreas J. Köstenberger and Justin Taylor, with Alexander Stewart

Combining a chronological arrangement of the biblical text with insightful commentary, this book serves as a day-by-day guide to Jesus’s final week on earth, complete with a quick-reference glossary and color maps.

Free Downloads:
Excerpt / Study Guide / 40-Day Reading Guide

 

The Final Days of Jesus: Wednesday, April 1, AD 33

Final_Days_header04In this week’s video series, well-known New Testament scholars explore the background and significance of the history-shaping events that occurred during Jesus’s last week on earth. Designed as a supplement to The Final Days of Jesus, our prayer is that these videos will help deepen your understanding and experience of Holy Week.



The Final Days of Jesus: Wednesday
from Crossway on Vimeo.

 

5-Final-Days-of-Jesus_Holy-Week-Wednesday

 

Previous Videos:


The Final Days of Jesus: The Most Important Week of the Most Important Person Who Ever Lived
Andreas J. Köstenberger and Justin Taylor, with Alexander Stewart

Combining a chronological arrangement of the biblical text with insightful commentary, this book serves as a day-by-day guide to Jesus’s final week on earth, complete with a quick-reference glossary and color maps.

Free Downloads:
Excerpt / Study Guide / 40-Day Reading Guide

 

April 16, 2014 | Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Biblical Studies,Books,Jesus Christ,Life & Doctrine,New Testament,The Gospel,Theology,Video | Author: Matt Tully @ 8:30 am | 0 Comments »

Midweek Roundup – 4/16/14

Each Wednesday we share some recent links that we found informative, insightful, or helpful. These are often related to Crossway books, Bibles, or authors—but not always. We hope this list is an interesting and encouraging break for the middle of your week.


1. Andreas J. Köstenberger and Justin Taylor highlight 5 errors to avoid when thinking about Easter

3. Don’t say the same crowds worshiped Jesus on Palm Sunday and then cried out for his crucifixion on Good Friday.

This kind of statement makes for a powerful sermon point to illustrate the fickleness of the human heart when it comes to Jesus the Messiah. But a couple of qualifications need to be added. First, it is not entirely clear that the “Hosanna!” crowd acclaiming Jesus’ triumphal entry is the same group of people as the “Crucify him!” crowd gathered before Pontius Pilate.

2. The Gospel Coalition interviews Kevin DeYoung on Taking God At His Word

What Scripture-related error is most “live” among evangelicals today? For what issue on the horizon will we need to be most equipped?

I see several. Let me briefly mention two. At the level of praxis, many evangelicals do not believe in Scripture’s perspicuity. Once they see that some Christians view an issue differently, they pack it in and give up ever knowing what the Bible says. We’ve seen this recently on the issue of homosexuality with certain voices calling for a moratorium on debating the issue because there are obviously two good positions out there and who are we to try to settle things. But, of course, PhDs disagree on almost everything in almost every field of human investigation. Evangelicals can be too quick to say “that’s just your interpretation” instead of actually making an argument from the Bible for their position.

3. Nancy Guthrie on the focus of her own funeral

I just got home from another funeral. Seems we’ve gone to more than our share lately. And once again, as I left the church, I pled with those closest to me, “Please don’t make my funeral all about me.”

We were an hour and fifteen minutes in to today’s funeral before anyone read from the scriptures, and further in until there was a prayer. Resurrection wasn’t mentioned until the benediction. There were too many funny stories to tell about the deceased, too many recollections, too many good things to say about the things she accomplished to speak of what Christ has accomplished on her behalf.

4. Books at a Glance reviews Acting the Miracle, edited by John Piper and David Mathis

The strength of the book is the repeated emphasis that sanctification is not monolithic. There is not merely one motivation, it is not only an individual thing, it does not only flow from justification, it takes a range of personal means of grace, and our act in it as Edwards says is simultaneously “wholly passive and wholly active.”

Welch’s chapter in particular was helpful as he gave years of wisdom in dealing with difficult cases. His emphasis on humans being embodied souls is a needed corrective to the overemphasis on the cognitive. Readers will benefit from this chapter’s test cases which ring with wisdom and much patient thought. Pastors and counselors dealing with depression, panic attacks, and ADHD should consult this chapter especially.

5. Gloria Furman reflects on treasuring Christ in the trenches

Do you think that moms can have a tendency to just give up on communing with God because of their season of life?

Sometimes we think that if only we could have peace and quiet in the house then we will have peace and quiet in our heart. How easy it is for us to relegate Jesus’ presence to an easy chair in a picture-perfect living room (with an accompanying cup of hot coffee)! For the mom facing that challenge of finding quiet time, I’d want her to know that, solitude or circus, it makes no difference in the sufficiency of Jesus Christ to give you everything you need for life and godliness.

| Posted in: AAA - BLOG UPDATE,Books,Midweek Roundup,News & Announcements | Author: Matt Tully @ 8:30 am | 0 Comments »