The Gospel Comes with a House Key: Practicing Radically Ordinary Hospitality in Our Post-Christian World

By Rosaria Butterfield

... Show All

The Gospel Comes with a House Key: Practicing Radically Ordinary Hospitality in Our Post-Christian World

By Rosaria Butterfield

... Show All

The word hospitality often invokes a scene of a gracious, impeccably fashioned host welcoming guests into a beautifully appointed home prepared with perfectly-presented meals. However, the biblical call to hospitality is a call to much more. In this book, Rosaria Butterfield invites readers into her home and shows from her own life and experience how "radically ordinary hospitality" can be a bridge for bringing the gospel to lost friends and neighbors—something that she experienced herself on her journey to Christ. Such hospitality welcomes those who look, think, believe, and act differently from us into our own everyday, sometimes messy lives. Christians will be inspired and equipped to use their homes and tables as a way of showing a skeptical, unbelieving world what love and authentic faith really look like.

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Author:

Rosaria Butterfield

Rosaria Butterfield (PhD, Ohio State University) is an author, pastor’s wife, homeschool mom, and former professor of English and women’s studies at Syracuse University. She is the author of The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert and Openness Unhindered.

Product Details

Title: The Gospel Comes with a House Key
Subtitle: Practicing Radically Ordinary Hospitality in Our Post-Christian World
Published: April 30, 2018
ISBN-10: 1-4335-5786-X
ISBN-13: 978-1-4335-5786-6
Category: Evangelism & Missions
Retail Price: $21.99
Binding: Hardcover w/ Jacket
Trim: 5.5 in x 8.5 in
Page Count: 240

Table of Contents

Preface

  1. Priceless: The Merit of Hospitality
  2. The Jesus Paradox: The Vitality of Hospitality
  3. Our Post-Christian World: The Kindness of Hospitality
  4. God Never Gets the Address Wrong: The Providence of Hospitality
  5. The Gospel Comes with a House Key: The Seal of Hospitality
  6. Judas in the Church: The Borderland of Hospitality
  7. Giving up the Ghosts: The Lamentation of Hospitality
  8. The Daily Grind: The Basics of Hospitality
  9. Blessed Are the Merciful: The Hope of Hospitality
  10. Walking the Emmaus Road: The Future of Hospitality

Conclusion: Feeding the Five Thousand: The Nuts and Bolts and Beans and Rice
Acknowledgments
Notes
Recommended Reading
General Index
Scripture Index

Endorsements

“Artfully woven into the fabric of who we are, each of us possesses an urgency to be included, an ache to be known, and a longing to be welcomed. In this book, Rosaria describes how the good news of the gospel not only meets our deepest needs but transforms us into cohosts who invite others to meet Jesus. Rosaria Butterfield’s enthusiasm for the unparalleled expression of hospitality—the Son of God on the cross drawing all men to himself—is what energizes her to practice radically ordinary hospitality and invite us all to do the same. This book will stir your imagination to generate creative ways to incorporate radically ordinary hospitality into your own life as well.”
Gloria Furman, author, Alive in Him and Labor with Hope

“God strongly advances his cause by raising up prophetic voices of fresh insight, bold words, and powerful impact. Rosaria Butterfield is just such a voice for God in our time. The Gospel Comes with a House Key is Rosaria’s heart reaching out to our hearts, calling us to love our neighbors with sacrificial hospitality. This book is going to shake us all up in the most wonderfully destabilizing way.”
Ray Ortlund, President, Renewal Ministries

“This book isn’t for those who want to live the comfortable Christian life. Rosaria proves there is no such thing. She has a unique way of blending personal story and theological teaching that challenges the reader to engage in areas of both agreement and disagreement. I was sharpened well in both cases.”
Aimee Byrd, author, Theological Fitness and No Little Women

“It’s easier than ever to live in communities with no real sense of community. Neighbors don’t know neighbors, and our lives are lived online rather than on the front porch. Rosaria Butterfield demonstrates how living a life of radically ordinary hospitality can allow strangers to become neighbors, and, by God’s power, those neighbors can become part of God’s family. I couldn’t put this book down—it’s compelling, challenging, and convicting.”
Melissa B. Kruger, Director of Women’s Initiatives, The Gospel Coalition; author, Growing Together

“One cannot spend any time at all with Rosaria Butterfield without a renewed sense of how good the good news really is. This book is a needed call to the church to model the hospitality of our Lord. As our culture faces a crisis of loneliness, this is the book we need. The book will inspire you and leave you with a notebook filled with ideas for how to practically engage your neighbors with the welcome of the gospel.”
Russell Moore, Public Theologian, Christianity Today; Director, Christianity Today's Public Theology Project

“The biblical call to show hospitality is one of the most overlooked or misunderstood commands in Scripture. We either ignore it or mistake it for what our culture calls ‘entertaining.’ Rosaria Butterfield gives us a vision of hospitality that pulses with the beating heart of the gospel itself. We know a God who sought us out, took us in, made us family, and seated us at his table. It’s a vision that is bracing and attractive. It daunts us, but it shouldn’t. I wonder how different our homes, churches, and culture would look if we took it to heart.”
Sam Allberry, pastor; author, 7 Myths about Singleness

“One of the hallmarks of the people of God is supposed to be hospitality. But in an age of commuter churches, towns disemboweled by shopping malls, and lives that are overscheduled and full of ceaseless activity, hospitality is something which, like true friendship, is at a premium. In this book, Rosaria Butterfield makes a bold case for putting hospitality back into the essential rhythm of the church’s daily life. She sets the bar very high—and there is plenty of room here for disagreement on some of the proposals and details—but the basic case, that church is to be a community marked by hospitality, is powerfully presented and persuasively argued.”
Carl R. Trueman, Professor of Biblical and Religious Studies, Grove City College